young woman in yoga pose
Tara Rayburg

12 Ways to Detox for Spring!

Most of us love this time of year. The days get longer, we start to see more sunshine (hopefully), and it feels like a time of new beginnings. A time where we want to come out of the hibernation of winter with a little “Spring” in our step if you will. We feel like moving again, want to get some weight off with summer around the corner, and generally just want to feel healthy.

It’s kinda like a New Year’s Resolution – we decide it’s time to “Detox,” and perhaps sign up for a quick fix, a cleanse, or a “short-term thing.” Now a well placed, guided-juice cleanse or detox can have its value for sure depending on your health status. But what if there are other ways to detox your body and life that have lasting change?

Here are just some high-level suggestions to try out and get started (don’t get overwhelmed, you can just pick one or two):

  1. Detox some stress from your life. Meditate! Yep that again…Keep it simple. This does not have to be on a Mountain in Tibet. The easiest is to find a meditation app like Calm.  You can select even 5 minutes to begin or end your day. Or check out your local yoga studio, they may offer classes and yoga itself is moving meditation.
  2. Detox your food. This is a BIG one.  Instead of worrying about some cleanse, how about checking that you’re eating real whole foods? Why not challenge yourself to see how you feel if you eat nothing processed for 7 days? Or go crazy and try a whole month! Read labels. The ingredients should be food and NOT something you can’t pronounce or never heard of. This may mean you have to cook and prepare your foods (Don’t panic). Make shopping lists and be strategic. This can truly alter your long-term health in the best way. This sounds like a much less crazier plan than drinking cayenne pepper mixed with honey 🙁
  3. Get rid of the artificial sweeteners. There are lots of natural options these days.
  4. Add celery juice to your morning or another green juice at some point during the day (always on an empty stomach) or a smoothie if you prefer.
  5. Add a salad to one meal a day or an extra veggie
  6. Eat the rainbow! Lots of color in our veggies.
  7. Drink water! If you need flavor try some lemon or lime. Check out that coffee creamer. Long list of ingredients? Ditch it altogether or try a coconut milk or non dairy creamer with as minimal ingredients as possible. Oh and the alcohol? Minimize or try getting rid of that too. Relax! It’s short term, but you would be amazed at how much clearer your mind and even skin could be.
  8. Ditch sugar. Not sugars from fruit, but you know, the kind that sneaks in everywhere else. A few squares of dark chocolate 70% cacao or above are fine.
  9. Suspect food sensitivities? Pick that one thing you know is causing inflammation and cut it out. Just try it. Gluten? Dairy?
  10. Find movement you will actually do! Try yoga, walking, dancing, playing basketball, or a group fitness class.
  11. Practice good sleep habits: cool room, no devices for an hour before, no food or drink right before bed, make the room as dark as possible, and my fav…add some white noise.
  12. Detox from your devices for a couple of hours or even a whole day or weekend!

One, two or all, can certainly be major steps to detoxing things you just don’t need in your life. Stress, foods, and technology cause inflammation in our bodies. Why not pick some things to keep for a lifetime instead of a few days?

You totally got this!
Tara Rayburg
Holistic Nutrition and Wellness Coach

Contact Tara today for a free wellness consultation! Together, we will discuss a program that may be right for you.

***

eTalkTherapy - Health and Wellness Holistic Nutrition CoachingAbout the author: Tara Rayburg is a Holistic Nutrition and Integrative Wellness Coach. Her devotion to healing with a healthy lifestyle was born from having to take her health back into her own hands for her own illnesses many years ago. She works with each individual on their unique health needs and supports you on accountability and support with food, improving energy, movement, and stress relief.

eTalkTherapy - Health and Nutrition Coaching
Tara Rayburg

What is a Health Coach and how can they help improve your life?

This term gets thrown around a lot and there can be a variety of types of Health Coaches with different areas of expertise. However, the Institute for Integrative Nutrition defines a Health Coach as:

A Health Coach is a wellness professional who works with clients one-on-one or in group settings to help them achieve their personal wellness goals including weight loss, boosting energy, or sleeping better.  It doesn’t stop there, though. Health Coaches act as a supportive mentor and guide to help their clients discover which foods and lifestyle makes them feel best. Coaches are accountability partners and even friends who give an unbiased approach to their clients and empower them to live the lives they love.”

That last line says it all, we teach you how to take the power back into your own hands. Too often those of us who struggle with any type of health issue want someone or something to “fix” us. Most of us Health Coaches know that feeling all too well.  We search for that thing outside of us. The truth is…only you can heal your body. Only you can feel what’s right for you. It’s a Health Coaches job to help support you in finding those tools and ultimately connect you with trusting yourself and your body again. To trust that your body is working FOR you, not against you. Health Coaches take a “wholistic” approach to your program and journey.

Does any of this sound familiar?

  1. Perhaps you are at point where managing exercise and nutrition seem out of reach. A Health Coach should meet you where you are and guide you to feel better in your body and life in long term sustainable ways. You don’t have to face this alone or change everything at once to move forward.

  2. You get started on new wellness goals and get stuck on triggers and blocks that prevent you from moving forward. This is usually the time people stop and revert to their old habits. There are actually numerous psychological roadblocks to keeping us stuck. So it’s not really about willpower. A good Health Coach works with you on these and keeps you on track with your goals and accountable as well as adapts to any changes you may need to make.

  3. You struggle with chronic or sometimes overwhelming health conditions. Have you been trying to figure out your options here? Even told there are no solutions or options left or you just have to “live with it”? No matter what you struggle with: chronic disease, widespread inflammation, weight issues, digestive issues or anxiety and depression (just to name a few), Health Coaches strive to help navigate this confusing world and work to find the root of the issues, rather than just treating symptoms. You can start to feel better with even the simplest of changes and of course we work with any other practitioners you work with and their recommendations.

  4. You’re sick of wasting money on ineffective plans or treatments and find it difficult to stay motivated. Most of us have signed up for online diet plans (and how many are there?), started fitness programs or challenges, bought a multitude of expensive supplements, or tried ineffective medications. Only to hit a wall when life happens and we give up on the diet, put those DVDs back on the shelf, quit going to the gym, or search for the next best thing.

  5. Typically the biggest roadblock people face? Time. We all have the same 24 hours in a day as they say. But most of us lead busy, full lives. And sure you absolutely need to prioritize health as number one because in order to be there for others, we want to be our best selves. A Health Coach gives you back some of your time trying to figure out what works for you. We keep up on the latest in health and wellness and we work together to see what works and what doesn’t.

With more people than ever before suffering with burnout, digestive disorders, autoimmune, and just overall inflammation, etc., it’s imperative to have the support to move toward finding that power within. To feel your best self. To thrive, not just survive.

Find that someone who has your back. I’m here to support you.

You’ve got this!
Tara Rayburg
Holistic Nutrition and Wellness Coach

The Accidental Existentialist Issue 5
eTalkTherapy

The Accidental Existentialist Issue 5

The Accidental Existentialist Issue 5. Photo by Alexander Stanishev at UnsplashRead the Winter 2018/19 edition of The Accidental Existentialist, eTalkTherapy‘s quarterly online magazine now or download the PDF to read later. In this issue you will find great articles and new works by Point Park University journalism student Derek Malush, mental health professionals Támara Hill, Morgan Roberts, and Mandi C. Dalicandro-Turk. Leave a comment to let us know what you think – Enjoy!

The winter sunset looms. The darkness gathers quickly, and the cold winds blow, but there kindles inside us a hopeful side to the long winter months. A flame remains in spite of its obscured existence. So here is my challenge to you, Dear Reader, stoke the flame.
May you head into the New Year believing you can make it a great year. Most  importantly, may you head into 2019 with a plan.

Great things in life seldom happen without resolve, energy and a creative spirit. The good stuff is the result of vision, strategy, hard work, and patience.

There’s some truth to what naysayers spout about resolutions, but the concept of resolutions is a good one. Used well and with good intent, they can provide the focus needed to turn goals into that ever elusive “new normal.”

We all have answers to what we want out of life. The problem is that we ask ourselves the wrong questions. Instead of asking “How?” or “Why?” try “When?” or “Where?”
Many people who’ve lost weight were rarely successful on the first or second try. Yet, they persevered.

If a goal is worth dreaming, it’s worth relentless effort and passion. Perseverance and resolve are key. Little in life is accomplished without them. So rather than abandon your New Year’s resolutions, add this one: “I resolve to keep my New Year’s resolutions.” Create a life worth living. Navigate those uncharted waters and stop being your own worst critic. Commitment counts. Remind yourself frequently of what you hope to achieve, and pursue it with urgency. Life is indeed short, with no guarantees. When does it start for you?

Have a Healthy and Happy New Year.

Peace,
Don

In this issue:


King. Me.
by Derek Malush

eTalkTherapy - Talk with a counselor online

Life is habitually referred to as a game. Numerous pieces, various rules, and the board on which we play is the ground we tread on.

Take chess for example. An intellectual’s game, which entails limitless hours of
practice to mature one’s strategy. I often amused the thought of chess as just
being an old person’s game. That when you see chess being played, it is, as
sappy indie films tell us, usually two older folks trying to out-duel one another
using their ripened wit and arduous tactics as if the rusted gates had just
dropped down on the beach of Normandy…Read more


Managing Family During the Holidays: 5 Roles to Avoid
by Támara Hill, MS, NCC, CCTP, LPC, Owner at Anchored Child & Family Counseling

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online

How do you plan to spend the holiday this year? Are you dreading the family gatherings? If so, you are not alone.

Research suggests that the holidays are often a time of intense grief and feelings of loss, existential discomfort (discussed below), revisiting of traumatic experiences, overwhelm with materialism and commercialism, and the dispiriting conversations around the table…Read more


Midterm Elections 2018: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
by Morgan Roberts, MSPC

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online

2018 saw a historic midterm election. Though, let us be honest, every election is historic. It shapes our government for years, and possibly generations. I am looking at you, Senate, for confirming known-assaulter Brett Kavanaugh.

However, what we saw was a glimmer of hope, the realities of a rigged system, and you know, white people just being themselves. You are probably reading this, hinting at my personal bias here…Read more


Navigating the Holidays & Associated Emotions with Awareness
by Mandi C. Dalicandro-Turk, MSPC

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online

During the holiday season, images of a crisp snow covered lane, with the view into the frosted window of a warm and cozy home, the scene of a blazing fire, a long decorative table filled with scrumptious holiday delights, and loved one’s surrounding the table brings feelings of dissonance for many. The holidays absolutely have the potential to bring feelings of intimate experiences filled with belonging, exhilaration, sharing, and gathering with loved ones.

For many, however, there are increases in stress, anxiety, depression, feelings of loneliness, difficulties with grieving and loss, conflict, and contemplation…Read more


Do you have an idea for an article or would you like to contribute to our magazine?

This is your opportunity to submit educational and informative content that promotes growth in all aspects of mental health issues from an existential or humanistic perspective. Upon publication of your article, you will receive a $25 stipend.

Submit your queries at eTalkTherapy.com/submit.

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online
Christy Gualtieri

To A Kid

by Christy Gualtieri

I had a very curious relationship with myself as a kid. (I need to preface this by saying that I was raised by two exceptionally loving parents and a wonderful family.  I can in all honesty say that I have been loved every day of my life.) But as a kid, I didn’t necessarily understand it the way I do now. I didn’t outwardly dislike myself; I was content in my own world of reading and writing, and I liked school and watching TV and spending time with my cousins and friends. But maybe it was because I had two younger brothers, one of whom was (and still is) very charismatic and loved the spotlight, that I found myself wanting to – no, needing to change in order to be someone worth knowing. I needed, somehow, more attention. I wanted the world – which is very difficult to navigate as an elementary schooler – to know who I was. So I tried.

I’ll give you some examples. One of the kids in my second grade class had glasses, and he was popular, so I squinted and begged and lied about having headaches in the classroom because I couldn’t see what the teacher had written on the board. He had glasses, so I needed them, too. (And although I didn’t get them then I did eventually need them…in middle school, and if anything they made me less popular.) One of the pretty girls in class had Type 1 diabetes and had to test her blood sugar by pricking her finger with a needle every day, and so I would draw a colored-in circle on my index finger with a red pen before I got on the school bus to show that I, too, needed special treatment for something because I was special, too. (I am acutely aware now, as an adult, of how messed up it sounds to pretend to have Type 1 Diabetes just to get attention, by the way.  It just made sense to me at the time.) And one day, in the middle of the school year, I insisted to everyone on the school bus that my real name wasn’t the plain one I wrote on my papers and teachers called me by. My real name is much more exotic. Veronica. And I wouldn’t answer to anything else. (…It’s a lovely name, but my name was never Veronica. It’s always been Christy.)

For all of the things I liked about myself, there were so many things I wanted to change. I always felt a step or two behind, always off-trend, always missing what everyone else seemed to intrinsically know. And I needed that validation, I guess. Parents and teachers always were ready with praises, but it was the recognition from my peers that meant the most to me. The only trouble was, it was the one I lacked the most. It also didn’t help that my ultra-charismatic brother, who went to the same school, was the class favorite. He always had an invite to the party, a large group of friends around, and he always knew what to say. I was always a bit chubby in middle school, and straight up ballooned in size well through high school and college, adding to my depression. I found it harder and harder to fight through all of the comments about my weight and the comparing I’d do to the other girls at school, but it was pretty plain to me that there wasn’t a whole lot about myself that I liked.

My parents would try to help, give me little pep talks and try to cheer me up, but not much clicked until college. That’s when I really found out who I was, and was able to surround myself with friends who I had so much in common with – and found out I could be my true self around. Because of them, I grew into a (mostly) confident adult who (sometimes) struggles with anxiety but who genuinely, in all honesty, today can say that she loves herself. It’s been a long process, but I’m really glad of it, because it’s made me into the person I am today.

My oldest child is starting elementary school this year, and I’ve already seen him comparing himself to his peers, pointing out to me where he doesn’t measure up. It breaks my heart, but I remember what it felt like for me to be his age. So I give him an extra hug, give him those extra moments of encouragement and send him on his way, ready with a pep talk of my own for when he gets off the school bus at the end of the day. He might not appreciate it now, but maybe he’ll get it, the way I once did, when I became a grown up.

Until next time, be well!
Christy

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online
eTalkTherapy

The Accidental Existentialist Issue 4

Read the FALL 2018 edition of The Accidental Existentialist now or download it to read later. In this issue you will find great articles by mental health professionals Morgan Roberts, Christina Pettinato and Don Laird, as well as freelance writer Aurora Starr. We would love to hear from you, please leave a comment below – Enjoy!

Through autumn’s golden gown we used to kick our way. You always loved this time of year.
Those fallen leaves lie undisturbed now that you’re not here…”
~ Justin Hayward

The Accidental Existentialist Fall 2018 Issue 4

A crisp autumn sky, crackling bonfires and brilliant colors floating delicately toward the ground, inspire many people to gather and celebrate the season. Yet, as always, there is a twinge of bitter-sweetness and sorrow as the year takes one final and glorious bow before it fades into the darkness and isolation of winter. Logically, we know that with spring new life will emerge from death.

Still, autumn is a conscious (or perhaps unconscious) reminder of our own mortality. A time when in spite of the colors and all the pumpkin deserts and drinks, we must acknowledge the brightness of our days is framed by the vividness and wisdom of our nights. The youthfulness of spring and summer now give way to the remembrance of all things lost, but not forgotten. All things must pass, and we are fortunate enough to recognize this as we move forward to the end of the seasons and ultimately the splendid finality of this mortal coil.

Enjoy the season. Drink in its grace and grandeur. Winter is indeed coming, but life continues.

Peace,
Don

In this issue:


Alice
by Don Laird, MS, NCC, LPC, DCC

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor onlineAlice was dead. A client I had known for only a short time, but her words still drifted across my consultation room as if they were just spoken. A slight, yet radiant smile, matched by hands confidently holding a mug of tea as she imparted the bittersweet details of a lifetime, mere shadows; wistful ghosts conjured on cue. Somehow, Alice had it figured out. Centuries of philosophical thoughts, tomes of written conjecture, all debating the questions of life and their ultimate meanings, yet none of it seemed as authentic or grounded as a 68-year old woman’s journey from Point A to Point Z, and all stop in-between. Read more…


Q&A with Therapist Christina Pettinato

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online

Christina (pictured above) adds her personal message to a “Before I Die…Wall in Cleveland, OH. This Wall is part of a series of interactive public art projects created by artist Candy Chang to encourage and inspire communities to share their stories and dreams in a public forum.

Through meaningful conversation and mindful discourse, you and I will embark on a journey toward change and purpose. Together we will navigate your issues in life through problem-solving techniques, self exploration and reflection. With you, my hope is to map out opportunities for growth, awareness, authenticity and mindfulness.” Read more…


Navigating the World in the #TimesUp Era
by Morgan Roberts, MSPC

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online
After The New Yorker and later The New York Times published bombshell reports of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment and assaults, we have been in the midst of a paradigm. A paradigm is a major shift in thought and behavior. Biological science was drastically changed by Darwin. Psychics was drastically changed by Hawking. Likewise, there are social shifts which have caused dramatic changes in society. We live in a different era with a different mindset than we did pre-Vietnam, pre-Columbine, pre-9/11, pre-Obama, pre-Trump. Yet, there has been no paradigm shift that has directly impacted me as the Weinstein allegations and the events which followed. Read more…


5 Films with an Existential Motif
by Aurora Starr

eTalkTherapy - talk with a counselor online

Existentialism is an analysis of human existence and the value and consequence of human choice. “Existence proceeds essence” with an aversion to any method designed to define humankind in a systematic or empirical way. In short, it is a philosophy concerned with finding meaning through free will, choice, and personal responsibility; a confrontation with existence by an exploration of death and meaning.

Hereafter, through the beauty of Netflix and Hulu, is a list of five films that highlight existential motifs in pure celluloid magic. Read more…


Do you have an idea for an article or would you like to contribute to our magazine?

This is your opportunity to submit educational and informative content that promotes growth in all aspects of mental health issues from an existential or humanistic perspective. Upon publication of your article, you will receive a $25 stipend.

Submit your queries at eTalkTherapy.com/submit.